Author Archives: Anne Wallestad

The Gendered Pathways Into Giving and Volunteering: Similar or Different Across Countries?

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. There has been a steady increase in research studying the role of gender in prosocial behavior, such as charitable giving and volunteering. We provide an extensive review of the interdisciplinary literature and derive hypotheses about three different pathways that lead men and women to differ in their display of giving and volunteering: pathways through social capital, motivations, and resources. We test these hypotheses across 19 countries by analyzing 28,410 individuals, using generalized structural equation models. Our results support previous research, conducted in single countries, that there are distinct different pathways that lead men and women to engage in giving and volunteering: Women report stronger motivations to help others, but men report more of the financial resources that make giving and volunteering possible. The gendered pathways to giving and volunteering that lead through social capital, educational achievement, and financial security vary by country.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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No Strings Attached: Philanthropy, Race, and Donor Control From Black Power to Black Lives Matter

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. This article examines a moment of crisis and experimentation in philanthropy from the late 1960s to analyze how race shapes philanthropy. Specifically, it considers two giving circles in Boston launched as a linked funding initiative to address economic and racial inequality: (a) a group of wealthy, White suburbanites who started the Fund for Urban Negro Development to direct donations with “no strings attached” to the other, (b) the Boston Black United Front Foundation, an entity started by Black power activists in the city. Using archival records of the two groups, I analyze their efforts to decouple hierarchies of race and giving in funder–grantee relationships, and connect scholarship on African American history and philanthropy to that on donor control. I frame the notion of “no strings attached” giving as relative and shaped by positioning and identity in ways that produce multiple understandings of the material and abstract “strings” of philanthropy.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Civil Society and Philanthropy in Africa: Parallels, Paradoxes and Promise

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Civil society and philanthropy in Africa are regularly theorized in formal terms and oft perceived as inherently democratizing forces. Yet, existing evidence exposes the limitations of these assumptions. This article provides an introduction to the symposium issue on civil society and philanthropy in Africa. The objective of the introduction, and the articles contained in the symposium, is to examine important questions related to civil society and philanthropy on the continent: What is the complex history and role of civil society and philanthropy in Africa? How have donor dependence and professionalization affected the effectiveness of the third sector? What are the contours of the relationship between the state and civil society? We ask these crucial questions in an attempt to provide a more nuanced and contextualized understanding of civil society and philanthropy on the continent.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Capital Structure and Debt Maturity in Nonprofit Organizations

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. This article examines the capital structure and debt maturity in nonprofit organizations (NPOs). In particular, we analyze whether these financing decisions are made as expected according to the two main theories used to explain the capital structure, that is, the trade-off and pecking order theories. To do so, we study the associations between NPOs’ indebtedness and their size, age, tangibility, liquidity, profitability, risk, and growth. We use fixed effects, probit, and Heckman selection models with unbalanced panel data containing 8,721 charities in the United Kingdom for the period 2011–2018 (60,222 year-obs). Our results show that the financing patterns of NPOs are consistent with the arguments of the pecking order theory. We also find that less than half of our sample uses long-term debt. Moreover, debt maturity is longer in larger NPOs, those with more tangible assets, or those with higher liquidity.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Evolving Crisis and Changing Networks: NGOs’ Stakeholder Engagement on the Global Refugee Crisis

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) increasingly utilize social media for strategic stakeholder engagement. This study proposes a network-oriented theoretical framework to understand how NGOs’ engagement with complex networks of stakeholders on the global refugee issue varies as the issue moves from low to high public attention stages. We draw from research on multistakeholder issue networks and issue niche theory and analyze a large-scale Twitter data set containing tweets from hundreds of organizations from more than 30 countries. This cross-national, longitudinal study tracks issue evolution and NGOs’ tie formation patterns among themselves and with complex stakeholders (i.e., government and media) as public attention to the refugee issue increases. The results of our exponential random graph models (ERGMs) show how cross-sector stakeholders interact dynamically and how different issue identities position NGOs uniquely in issue niches as the issue evolves. We also find that organizations’ country-level homophily influences tie formation. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Nonprofit Financial Response to Immigration

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Nonprofit organizations are important actors in local communities, providing services to vulnerable populations and acting as stewards for charitable contributions from other members of the population. An important question is whether nonprofits spend or receive additional revenues in response to changes in the populations they serve. Because immigrant populations both receive and contribute to nonprofit resources, changes in immigrant numbers should be reflected in changing financial behavior of local nonprofits. Using data from the National Center for Charitable Statistics and the American Community Survey, we study whether nonprofit financial transactions change in response to changes in the local immigration population, the nature of the change, and the degree to which these changes vary by nonprofit type. Findings suggest that nonprofit financial behavior changes with growth and decline in immigrant populations underscoring the importance of nonprofits as service providers and contribute to an understanding of how organizations respond to external forces.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Transitions Into and Out of Voluntary Work Over the Life Course: What is the Effect of Major Life Events?

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. The aim of the current study is to investigate which major life events are associated with transitions into and out of volunteering over the life course and, especially, why these associations exist. Social Production Function theory is used to derive hypotheses, which are tested using longitudinal data (adult subsample) from Lifelines. Associations between major life events and (a) volunteer take-up, nonvolunteer sample (N = 59,773) and (b) volunteer cessation, volunteer sample (N = 32,143) are studied by applying Linear Probability Modeling. Results show clear associations between specific major life events and starting and quitting volunteering. The influence on the latter is stronger than on the former. Most findings are in line with our theory-based expectations indicating that (a) voluntary work contributes especially to the fulfillment of the needs for status, stimulation, and behavioral confirmation and (2) life events causing losses (gains) in these needs are associated with a higher likelihood to take-up (quit) volunteering.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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December 2021 open thread

Our goal with hosting quarterly open threads is to give blog readers an opportunity to publicly raise comments or questions about GiveWell or related topics (in the comments section below). As always, you’re also welcome to email us at info@givewell.org or to request a call with GiveWell staff if you have feedback or questions you’d prefer to discuss privately. We’ll try to respond promptly to questions or comments.
You can view previous open threads here.
The post December 2021 open thread appeared first on The GiveWell Blog.

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