Author Archives: operator

Businesses Venturing Into the Social Domain During the Covid-19 Pandemic: A Motivation and Ability Perspective

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Many businesses have joined governments and nonprofit organizations to serve the social needs under the tremendous pressure of Covid-19. We propose that businesses that expanded into the social domain during the Covid-19 crisis differ significantly from each other and vary extensively in value creation. We extend the motivation and ability framework to derive a typology of businesses under this situation and conceptualize value creation behaviors in both a free market and a monopolistic market with the governments as the buyer.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Civil Society and COVID in China: Responses in an Authoritarian Society

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Can civil society play a useful role in response to a pandemic like COVID-19 in a one-party state? We explore that issue based on the role of civil society and philanthropy in responding to COVID in China, where a large and innovative—and restricted—civil society and philanthropy sector has developed. Our preliminary findings are that while restrictive policies toward civil society significantly limit the role that civil society organizations and philanthropy can have in response to the pandemic, civil society still shows strength and vitality in emergency service, funding, volunteering, mutual aid, in-kind donations, and even policy advocacy. While the prospects for civil society in China are uncertain because of political restrictions before and during the COVID crisis, civil society continues to build capacity and show its capabilities to Chinese citizens and its governance institutions.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Duke receives $16 million to increase faculty diversity, inclusion

The largest portion of the grant will be directed to the recruitment and retention of faculty from underrepresented groups, while the remaining $5.5 million will be used to create a more inclusive environment for faculty, students, and the broader university community….

Philanthropy News Digest | https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/rss/feed/pndnews

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2020 Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering announced

Twenty innovative early-career scientists and engineers in fields such as astrophysics, biomedical engineering, chemistry, computer and informational science, neuroscience, and plant biology will each receive $875,000 over five years to pursue their research….

Philanthropy News Digest | https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/rss/feed/pndnews

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Miami University receives $20 million from alumnus

The gift from Richard M. McVey (’81) will underwrite construction of a facility for the Emerging Technology in Business and Design department, as well as the departments of statistics and mathematics, the Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies, and the Center for Analytics and Data Science….

Philanthropy News Digest | https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/rss/feed/pndnews

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Walther Cancer Foundation commits $11 million to expand research

The commitment will establish the Walther Cancer Foundation Bioinformatics Fund in support of bioinformatics personnel, technology, and tools 
at Purdue’s center for Cancer Research and the IU Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center….

Philanthropy News Digest | https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/rss/feed/pndnews

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Leadership and Governance in Times of Crisis: A Balancing Act for Nonprofit Boards

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the roles of nonprofit boards? We reflect critically on the leadership and management activities of boards to understand the implications of the current crisis on governance. Employing a contingency approach to governance, we present a model of boards of directors’ leadership and management roles under four governance configurations as organizations navigate through the stages of the pandemic. We suggest that organizations with governance configurations that are more suited to predictable environments will generally experience greater shifts between management and leadership activities as they move through the stages of the COVID-19 crisis.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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Missouri University of Science & Technology receives $300 million gift

The gift — the largest in the history of Missouri higher education — will establish a new not-for-profit foundation, the Kummer Institute Foundation, and support several new initiatives, including the Kummer School of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development….

Philanthropy News Digest | https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/rss/feed/pndnews

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Maximum Impact Fund update: We estimate GiveWell donors’ $15.3 million to the Against Malaria Foundation will save over 3,000 lives

Thanks to our donors, we have disbursed $23.3 million in flexible funding to our top charities this year. This generous, flexible support is worthy of celebration!
This post focuses on our decision to grant $15.3 million to the Against Malaria Foundation (AMF), which includes the $11.7 million that donors gave to “Grants to recommended charities at GiveWell’s discretion” in the first half of 2020.[1]
AMF supports the distribution of insecticide-treated nets in areas with high rates of malaria. The nets stop mosquitoes from biting and spreading the disease. We estimate our donors’ support for AMF will collectively save over 3,000 lives, mostly of young children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Guinea.[2] Without this grant, we think net distributions in DRC and Guinea would have been delayed.
We believe that AMF was the highest-impact choice for this grant. We chose AMF after assessing the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on our top charities, the urgency of our top charities’ funding needs, and our estimates of their impact per dollar. We’re grateful for GiveWell donors’ trust in providing flexible funding to fill this need.
Why we chose AMF
We typically allocate flexible donations to our top charities every quarter. However, we delayed allocating the donations we received to “Grants to recommended charities at GiveWell’s discretion” in the first quarter of 2020. We wanted to better understand the impact of the growing COVID-19 pandemic on charities’ budgets and plans before making a decision about where funding would have the greatest impact.
AMF was a top contender for receiving this grant because of its high estimated impact per dollar. It is continuing its work during the pandemic, with some delays and modifications.[3] However, we wanted to resolve a couple open questions about its work before making a grant.[4]
First, we wanted to make sure that AMF needed additional funding. At the end of 2019, it held around $70 million that was earmarked for specific distributions, but we were unsure how much of this funding would be formally committed.[5] As of June 2020, AMF had committed nearly all of this funding and held only around $4 million in uncommitted funds.[6] Distributions AMF hoped to carry out in DRC and Guinea in late 2021 to early 2022 would require significantly more than $4 million.[7] There is a strong

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Combating COVID-19 Together: China’s Collaborative Response and the Role of Business Associations

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Ahead of Print. Drawing on data from Zhejiang Province, this study explores China’s collaborative response to COVID-19 in which business associations played a critical role. Consistent with existing literature on cross-sector collaboration and nonprofit contributions in extreme events, the preliminary findings of this study carry significant implications for future research to advance new knowledge. Specifically, two important next steps of future research that hold considerable promise—examining the overwhelming impact of the institutional environment on collaboration and accounting for the complex mechanisms in which multiple components of collaboration create outcomes through a configurational approach—emerged from this study. In addition, the practical implications of these findings are highlighted.

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly | https://journals.sagepub.com/action/showFeed?ui=0&mi=ehikzz&ai=2b4&jc=nvsb&type=etoc&feed=rss  

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